Are There Benefits To Segregation?

Wandering the “stalls” of EATALY in New York City is like shopping in a sprawling, outdoor food market in Italy – only it’s inside, and only no one speaks Italian.  But besides that it’s just like an Italian market. What makes it so enticing, is that everything (but luckily not everyone) is naked.

The food exposes itself, flaunting its superior qualities without distraction from other foods. In the cheese section, a man cloaked in a white jacket, the kind butchers wear, was skewering pieces of sheep’s milk cheese with a toothpick and handing them out  – no crackers or bread, just the sweet, deeply flavored cheese.

And it’s not just individual foods that stands alone, food groups are segregated.  If you want to sit for waiter service, you have to choose before you sit, what part of the food pyramid you’d like to eat from – fish, pasta/pizza, vegetables. Each category is in a different part of the market, meaning if you change your mind once you choose your seat, you have to change your seat.  When you’re in Fish you’re really in fish – no vegetables for a hundred yards.

We sat in Vegetables and had a roasted fennel dish–fennel, tomatoes, onions and olives. Very simple. No ingredient clutter. The kalamata olives were rich and fragrant and clinging to their pits. The joy of chewing the flesh off a perfect olive is one of life’s great pleasures.  I took some liberties in re-creating it at home (the final result pictured above), but it truly is outstanding. See recipe here. On a taste/ease matrix, this dish is wedged way into the upper right corner.

What this segregation does, is force you to focus on the singular qualities of that food. There’s a line from the movie “Little Miss Sunshine”, where Toni Collette’s character says,”We have to let Olive be Olive.” (Olive is her quirky daughter.)  We also have to let olives be olives and fennel be fennel, and focus on what makes them unique.

But in America we’re all about inclusion – of religions, lifestyles .. but we have extended this attitude way too far into food. Everything’s welcome on the pizza! The more the merrier! Domino’s offers a choice of fifty four, (fifty four!) toppings of the lowest quality ingredients you can find.  We want four different cheeses layered into our heap of nachos, and eight different toppings for our burger!

We should not be a melting pot! And toss every mediocre ingredient into the pot. We should expect our food to stand on its own! To do this though requires the food to be unprocessed and as fresh as possible – the kind that actually tastes good naked. There is a reason why that floppy orange square that must first be stripped of its plastic skin, is labeled “cheese product” and not cheese*. And a reason why it’s never invited to the cheese platter.

Here’s what I’ve been segregating and celebrating lately …

Yogurt: I make my own from farmers market whole milk. (I’ve recently started using raw milk, which brings it to an entirely new plane! But that’s not necessary.) I let it culture for 24 hours (most commercial yogurts are cultured for an hour or two at too high temps which kills the bacteria). Homemade yogurt is more pungent, more deliciously sour. I usually add a light sprinkle of nuts or seeds or some diced apples but lately, never honey or sugar.  I now taste the yogurt and experience the contrast between the sour and the slight sweet of the fruit.

Eggs: Buy orange-yolked ones, pasture raised from the farmers market, and you will never go back to the pale-faced variety.  And when you eat them, do not under any circumstances toss the yolks!  The yolk contains all the fat soluble vitamins (A,D,E,K), as well as protein and good fat.  The hen has provided you with the yolk for a reason. I add the whisked eggs to a cast iron pan of sizzling butter with some sauteed onions and that’s it. I never used to eat eggs this way – eggs were a way to “get protein” but sometimes I just let eggs be eggs.

Kale: It’s not in season now (at least not in the North East) but it’s in season at my Whole Foods and the lacinato kale has been exceptionally good. It’s deep green and when you heat it, it turns sweet.  I saute it with nothing more than a touch of pure virgin coconut oil and a pinch of salt. I can’t recommend the coconut oil and kale combo enough. Try it and you’ll see.

Cheese: Latest favorite snack – a little piece of Parmesan touched with a hint of honey. I recommend eating it standing up over the kitchen counter.

Try this – choose one food this week and buy the very best version of that food you can find.  Eat it with one or two accent flavors, but focus on “it”. Let its “it-ness” be what you taste. (One good place to start, fennel and olives.)

Your views?  Do we know what “real” food tastes like anymore? How to we get people to want to eat simple, unprocessed foods when we’ve been so conditioned to eat “melting pot” food? Your favorite foods to eat “naked”?

Related Posts
How To Make Your Own Yogurt
Ask Not What You Can Do For Your Kale
The Last Time You Had This Nutrient Was In Breast Milk (The benefits of coconuts and coconut oil)

* There are fifteen ingredients in Kraft Singles. The very LAST ingredient is “cheese cultures”.

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  • Cindy

    OMG – gorgeous photo! I am going to make this dish for the sheer beauty of it! And I will be sure to taste the components with all the attention they deserve …

  • http://three-cookies.blogspot.com/ Three-Cookies

    Totally agree with your key message. Once you’ve eaten real pizza made with just a few ingredients the 54 topping pizza you refer to no longer seems like pizza. Scandinavian cooking is starting to gain popularity because of its focus on few quality ingredients. Most of my meals and recipes have just a handful of ingredients. Less is more!

  • Régina

    As usual you are right on! Simplify, simplify, simplify, and taste what you are eating. (Makes for less work too).

  • http://www.suzyeats.com Suzy Eats

    The homemade yogurt sounds delicious. I recommend it for so many women who have problems with yeast infections and it is a definite cure. This is a great recommendation that I am going to include to my patients. Thanks.-www.suzyeats.com

    • Michelle

      Great! Yeast (or candida) is one of the bacterias we have in us that can easily over-populate, and yes, the probiotic bacteria in yogurt is super helpful to keep the yeast bacteria at bay. (Yeast bacteria, btw, loves sugar, so you might want to suggest as well to your patients, not to go overboard when/if they sweeten their homemade yogurt.)

      The key to the most potent homemade yogurt is getting a starter yogurt that is high already in probiotics (ideally more than just the 2 basic yogurt strains-check the ingredients) and then culturing it long enough to let the bacteria really grow.

      • kelly

        I want to make my own yogurt again, but it must be sweetened. I have never liked yogurt much so the sweetener is what gets it down the hatch.

        I had made it before but it had to be made plain before adding any sweetener just before eating, and I ended up throwing it all away. Now I have a new yogurt maker that lets you add flavors in the jars. I even have some organic raspberry jam waiting for the day I get the courage up to make yogurt again. (In the summer I’ll even make my own jam.)

        SO, my question is, I don’t LIKE bitter, sour yogurt. Is it still good for you if you make it sweeter?

        ALSO, can you make yogurt out of a non-dairy “milk” like almond milk? That seems like a stupid question; it seems yogurt must be made out of animal milk to be yogurt, but what do I know?

        Any idea?

        • fifty

          I made homemade yogurt for years. It never tasted more sour and pungent than commercial yogurt. Just the opposite, it was much milder and creamy tasting. As I prefer milder yogurt, this was great, because I didn’t need to add sugar. And fruit tasted better when added to it.

          Culturing for 24 hours seems excessive, unless one likes sour yogurt. I’ve always cultured for 8 hours, sometimes just 6 hours, if the yogurt has already set. In my experience, length of culture set is directly proportional to sourness. The longer set makes for more sour yogurt.

          • Michelle

            Could be — I do tend to like it more sour.

        • Michelle

          It’s not a prob adding some jam, honey etc to sugar to make it sweeter, that will not diminish the bacterial properties BUT .. I would highly encourage you to add the sweet AFTER you’ve made it. I would be highly suspicious of what the ingredients are in the “flavor” packets you speak of – do you know?

          You can make yogurt with nondairy (say almond, coconut soy etc). There are tons of sites and videos online about how to, so just google it. I would avoid buying the commercial yogurt though, especially the non dairy variety, as they often add fillers such as guar gum, tapioca etc to thicken it. They also often add probiotics AFTER the yogurt is cultured so much of the probiotics you’re getting may not even be from the actual fermentation process.

          • kelly

            I don’t know what “flavor” packets you mean. I just have a jar of organic jam: red raspberries, concentrated grape juice, fruit pectin.

            This is the machine: http://www.cooking.com/products/shprodde.asp?SKU=221017

            And while I’ve got some yógourmet freeze-dried starter, I thought this time I’d use some stonyfield organic plain yogurt for starter.

  • http://katzinn.com meezermom

    I love olives and these look so good!
    Parmesan touched with a hint of honey – sounds great. I have some Parmesan in fridge right now I’ll give it a try.
    I’ve been so interested in making my own yogurt lately – I don’t like it sweet. I generally use just plain and mix in my own fruit – if the fruit is tart I add a quarter teaspoon of honey.
    I can’t wait to try the Kale sauteed Coconut oil too. I’ve started getting into all the benefits of Coconut – water – milk, etc. and just bought a jar of Coconut oil from the co-op a couple of weeks ago and Kale is one of my favorite veggies!
    Being gluten free has meant I’ve had to try various foods without their wheat based accompaniments – for instance burgers without buns. I never would have thought it would be satisfying and have been surprised how wrong I was. If the food one uses are of good quality – they should be good eaten alone.
    Thanks for the ideas!

    • Michelle

      Here here! I think sometimes when you HAVE to give up certain foods – like in your case gluten – you DO become more aware of the other flavors and you start to realize that many of the “essential” food accessories, we always thought we needed to enjoy a food, we don’t!

      Report back after you’ve tried the kale with coconut oil – love to hear your thoughts…

      • http://katzinn.com meezermom

        The Kale sauteed in coconut oil was wonderful!! We’re not much for salt here so didn’t add the pinch in. I did add a handful of sunflower seeds for extra texture. Thanks much for the suggestion!

        • Michelle

          Oh I’m so glad! I’m warning you though – once you discover coconut oil, you will start using it in everything!!! You might want to give your family the heads up :)

  • kelly

    I *totally* get what you’re saying about the Dominos Pizza 54 ingredient thing and I agree, on a gut level. But the thing is, I *just* read an article yesterday about libel, and I worry that you’ve presented a sentence that could open yourself up to accusation.

    Libel is where you present a negative, damaging opinion without facts. So when I read that sentence, I looked for evidence that it’s either your opinion (“I think Domino’s…”) or that you have evidence (“according to this report, link here…”)

    And I like your blog and it makes me uncomfortable that you’ve opened yourself up to this possibility. Would you consider rewriting that sentence?

    • Michelle

      Thanks for your concern … Here’s the link to the list of 54 ingredients that Domino’s offers… http://www.dominos.com/pages/ingredients.jsp

      In terms of my claiming their ingredients as “lower quality” -you’re right that this is a value judgment and I do not mean it as a slam on the co – they are not TRYING to be a high end food brand! There is certainly an ingredient continuum and I think Dominos ingredients are “acceptable” (some might even say delicious) but I don’t think anyone is buying the pizza from them for the quality of their olives (tinned) or the premium cut of their salami.

      But I do appreciate your raising this issue — our food choices and attitudes are highly personal – with one person’s “best” pizza, being the others person’s “worst”. Hence why there will never be a monopoly in the pizza world :)

  • Hannah

    As usual, great post!

    We use coconut oil for everything; we cook with it, bake with it, use it for moisturizing, our daughter’s diaper rash, our hair.

    Can’t wait to try the “plain” kale.

    I love Brie and honey, mozzarella sounds like it would be yummy!

    • Michelle

      Actually it is Parmesan that I have with honey (though mozzarella am sure would be excellent too) … I first encountered it when I was in Italy and they serve it as a dessert. Parmesan with a touch of honey. That was it! That was dessert. And now a frequent snack in my non-Italian home…

  • Hannah

    Sorry for the double post, my phone made me retype.

    • Michelle

      Not a prob! Will delete the second one from my end …

  • http://www.cleareyedsky.com Liz

    I recently began making my own yogurt. It is a countertop variety (Viili), and does not need the elevated temperatures often required of other cultures. I wasn’t sure what to expect, but I found that I actually enjoy it plain! I do add fruit for variety and antioxidants.

    Another bonus regarding eggs: the yolks, when in liquid form, contain phosphatidylserine, a phospholipid that is amazing for brain health!

    • Michelle

      I don’t know Villi – can you tell me a bit more about it? Is this a type of yogurt maker? I agree that very low temps are key to full probiotic yogurt! I use only the heat from a radiator and it works really well.

      • fifty

        A radiator sounds like it would work well. It shouldn’t ever get too hot. Also, it conserves energy by using a heat source that already exists, while my method uses more energy.

        I actually use my electric food dryer. the instructions said you could use it for that. But the narrow space between stacked layers seemed impractical. Turned out the food dryer company offered yogurt cups for their dryers. They looked like white, slightly over-sized petri dishes.

        I wasn’t sure it would work. But it turned out to be the best yogurt ever. Now, it’s the only way I make it. I think the flat yogurt cups make for a more uniform heating, no hotter spots. I used to get a kind of overdone granular bottom of the yogurt in the containers I used before.

        Negatives to this are the electric dryer emits some heat, which is okay in winter but can be a bit much when it’s warmer. It’s also a little noisy, with the air being blown thru constantly and the motor and fan running. The flat cups are subject to spilling (I actually fill them after I put them in the dryer). But they hold more than they look like they do.

        • http://katzinn.com meezermom

          This is interesting Fifty. One of the reasons I haven’t made yogurt at home is I don’t have a yogurt maker – its been on my ‘wish list’ for a while.
          I do however have a food dehydrator – generally though I try to load all of the trays when I use it because it does take quite a bit of energy. How long will homemade yogurt keep in the fridge?
          Can you tell me where I can get more information on making yogurt this way?

          • Michelle

            My homemade yogurt rarely lasts more than a week, simply b/c it gets eaten! But you can keep the yogurt for weeks (if not longer) before it goes bad. In fact before it actually tastes “off”, it will simply lose some of its bacterial/probiotic strength, so best to eat it soon after you’ve made it. In other words, make smaller batches more often.

      • http://www.cleareyedsky.com Liz

        Viili is a type of yogurt starter culture. Many varieties of yogurt need a yogurt maker or some other way of keeping it at an elevated temperature. This culture is activated at room temperature. Then, you use 1 tablespoon of yogurt added to 1 cup of milk. Let it sit on your countertop for 12 to 18 hours, refrigerate for 6 hours, then it’s ready to eat. Very simple! I hope you don’t mind a link to my source: http://www.culturesforhealth.com/starter-cultures/yogurt-starter.html

        • Michelle

          So you use your Villi starter in addition to the yogurt? I’ve only ever just used yogurt as a starter (no additional “starters”), and I culture it w/o a yogurt maker-just warmth of the radiator. What do you feel your starter is bringing that the basic alone yogurt isn’t? Additional (and different) strains of bacteria and yeast perhaps from the Viili?

          • http://www.cleareyedsky.com Liz

            I ordered this starter culture and received it in the mail. You start out with 1/2 teaspoon of the culture (it is in a dry form, a coarse texture) and 1/2 cup milk. You leave it at room temp until for about 24 to 48 hours, until it comes to the correct consistency. Then, when you want to make more yogurt, you just use 1 tablespoon (from the 1/2 cup activation batch you just made) and add it to 1 cup of milk, then you leave it on the counter to set. After it is set and ready, you can use *that* yogurt to make additional batches of yogurt using the 1 tablespoon yogurt to 1 cup milk ratio, and so on. I feel there are several benefits for using the starter culture: I like the idea that I know exactly what sort of yogurt I’m using, I didn’t have to use a store-bought yogurt with additives, and I am able to use a type that sets at room temperature. It is definitely better for me, personally, to use the counter top variety because I live in Florida. No radiator in this house! Hahah! It might be easier for others to use this variety in the summertime when the house is in the 70′s and the heater isn’t running. As far as the strains of bacteria . . . I wish I could say I were more of a probiotic expert! That had nothing to do with my choice. But, now that you mention it, I might look into it more.

  • http://6512andgrowing.wordpress.com/ 6512 and growing

    Michelle,
    I love your point here. One strong, high quality flavor trumps 54 mediocre any day.

    I took a vow of localism this summer and spent the fall in a fun frenzy of food preservation. And because our produce choices have been intentionally and joyfully limited to what I’ve preserved from my garden and the farmers market, our pizza may have simply four toppings (including the cheese) but each one is a culinary treat.

  • Tomas

    Seafood: almost always best “naked”. Especially oysters. If you jus gotta load yer oyster with all kinds of sauce, then you need to get some better oysters!

    • Michelle

      I’m with you – though I can’t say I’m yet at the level of being able to “chew” the oyster, I do still want to get that taste of the sea in my mouth, not the taste of the hot sauce!

    • http://hudsondesign.us Allison Culbertson

      Had fresh caught mutton snapper tonight with just a hint of lime, butter, salt an pepper and it was divine!

      • Michelle

        Yum! I’ve never heard of mutton snapper. Is it very different from “regular” snapper?

        • http://hudsondesign.us Allison Culbertson

          This was super fresh just caught in deep water off the FL Keys. Mildly sweet white flaky flesh.

    • http://katzinn.com meezermom

      I so agree! I could never understand why people loaded tartar sauce on their fish! – either they don’t really like fish – or they’ve never really tasted it to know.
      Its hard to get fresh fish around here – I lived in CA for many years when I was younger and got spoiled with all of the good fish. When I came back to MI and tried to buy fish – after having to return it to the grocery a couple of times I started asking to smell it before I bought it. Many people don’t know if the fish is starting to smell like ammonia its not fresh. Maybe people who think they don’t like fish just haven’t had good fresh fish and so they load it up so they can’t taste it.
      I also don’t like mine battered and fried.
      Love Oysters too with just a little drop of Tabasco.

      • Tomas

        Amen Brother (or Sister)! One or two drops of lime for me on the oyster. I eat a lot of fish, mostly with a little salt and pepper. And it only takes a few minutes to prepare and cook.

    • fifty

      Except for a good fish soup! The best fish soups I’ve ever eaten were wonderful. But they lost some of it (had a fishy smell) the next day, and 2-3 days later really weren’t as good. So make enough for a meal, with maybe a couple of servings for next day lunch or dinner.

  • http://www.thetableofpromise.blogspot.com The Table of Promise

    My favorie foods to eat naked? Nuts, fruit, any kind of raw food, etc.

    It is interesting that you wrote this post. I was just thinking today that so many of the “American Foods” for which we are so famous, ice cream, pizza, french fries, are incredibly complicated to make at home. They require numerous steps and lots of work. Sometimes they requiring laborous steps of rising and chooping and cooling and freezing. Aside from the pizza (which I regularly make at home from scratch and load up with veggies and farmer’s market cheese) , the food industry has made all these complicated foods easy for us. So while I have tried to switch to homemade versions of all my favorite foods, it is way too much work to eat all that complicated stuff. Hence, Michael Pollan tells us that we can eat as much ice cream as we want as long as we are willing to make it ourselves.
    I have concluded that not enough is written about a wild caught cod filet roasted with butter and salt and pepper and served alongside a baked potato and steamed broccoli. It is a shame that simple fare doesn’t always make the most compelling story to the average reader. You presented the topic with alot of style today.

    • Michelle

      Thanks! It’s very true what you say about the “complicated” foods being the ones we have become accustomed to eating. They are the ones that are all engineered in the lab to be the kind that we simply can’t refuse and which our taste buds love! High fat, high salt, high sugar … There is no question it takes a lot of training of our taste buds to actually enjoy the simple sweetness of a roasted carrot.

  • http://lauramychal.com Laura

    I think that celebrating a single item of food is a revelatory experience. It’s parallel to meditating on ourselves. There is much more there than we first assume. The more we allow contemplation over the fruit or vegetable, egg or fish the more dimensions we find. Thus, more aspects to appreciate are discovered as well. I agree that we have forgotten to appreciate what we have, and therefore we always want more. Especially us Americans: we truly cannot get enough. I can understand your foray into the Italian food philosophy. I traveled there once and ordered a sandwich with this and that, and that, and this and that on it. The deli-counter-man thought I was out of my mind! “Way too much!” he said. How could I savor the meats and cheeses with all the extras? No I couldn’t. Less is definitely more.
    And now, a glass of whole milk is a revelation. A slice of artisan cheese is interesting. A raw Brazil Nut is a comfort food. Food is like life: we need to allow ourselves to feel and taste the depths.

    • fifty

      You know, I remember from 20-30 some years ago, a story I read about famous gourmets. Hey, strange, I know, but maybe the strangeness was why I read it. At the time, famous eaters of fine foods were kind of stars in the food world as it existed then.

      Anyway, this food writer traveled to France for a coveted invitation to stay a day or two with one of these famous gourmets. They sat down for dinner. Bowls of luscious home grown strawberries were served with wonderful local cream. They were big bowls, so the writer held back after a while to not fill up before the main course. It took a few minutes for him to realize that that was the main course. That was dinner. Eating only scrumptious strawberries with tasty real cream. Simplicity ruled. So he filled up and loved it. Also learning a lesson about what was really gourmet.

      • Michelle

        Strawberries! I could eat an entire bowl, “sans” cream!

        • http://katzinn.com meezermom

          Strawberries and yogurt – one of my favorites!

    • Michelle

      It’s so funny that you mention the sandwich and being told “no!” to more “stuff” on it. I was in France at a boulangerie and ordered a simple ham on baguette which was nothing but ham, some butter and the baguette. I asked the man selling me my lunch if me might be so kind as to put some lettuce say, or perhaps a couple slices of tomatoes on it. He too said “no!” that as it was prepared, was the way it was meant to be eaten … And so that’s the way I ate it.

  • http://www.ffflourish.com Laura

    parmigiano + honey = love. and yes, i agree, there’s something nice about the over-counter nibbling. haven’t been to eataly yet, but love your take on it. what are some of your fave spots in the city overall? (have you posted about this already?) :)

    • Michelle

      I’ve not posted about my fave restos in NYC- in part b/c I do so much of my own cooking and in part b/c there are so many other sites that DO! But I do have some I love … The Fat Radish (on the lower east side) is outstanding! I’ve always been a fan of The Spotted Pig (West Village) and of course one of the most divine of all (when your wallet’s feeling thick) Blue Hill.

      If you have any you’re thinking about trying, and I happen to have been, I’m more than happy to give my thoughts…

      • Laura

        Oh, I’ve been wanting to go to Blue Hill for quite some time. Perhaps your mention of it is a sign that it’s time for me to move it to the top of my list for Spring!

  • dawn

    Discovering foods for what they are simply can open up the possibilities in using them in more complex dishes. Also changing up the cooking technique, eating the ingredient raw vs. steamed vs. roasted vs. grilled etc… Each lends a different flavor experience to the item… For instance the beet… Roasted vs. boiled vs. fried beet slices. All sweet and flavorful. All very good. The more you know and experience with each ingredient. The more you know about how it is made, grown or even where it came from, the more versatility lends itself to the ingredient… Have fun playing!!!! As i will!!!

    • Michelle

      Yes! Totally agree, and the more you know the less those ingredients can intimidate you!

  • Lucía

    Ooooh, sinchronicity! Leo Babauta over at mnmlist blogged about this today too – check it out: http://mnmlist.com/pizza/

    • Michelle

      That’s crazy! Leo and I must be cosmic siblings …

  • Bette

    Some good thoughts on simplifying the grocery list and palette, though, there are times when a variety/combo of flavors is just too exquisite not to experience. It’s not either-or, it’s whatever one is in the mood for and whatever feeds the belly and the soul at the moment.

    As far as my favorite “plain” (naked, simple, whatever…) food — BEANS! Just beans. Cooked in water until perfectly done, salted, rested, consumed. Additions of more perfect foods to the perfect beans — baked rice, chopped onions, olive oil & balsamic vinegar. Or, just the beans.

    Bette

    • Michelle

      Agree that there is absolutely a time for a beautiful complex medley of flavors! But until you can play your scales perfectly on a piano and make them sound magical all on their own, then there is little chance that you will be able to compose an orchestral masterpiece … You know what I mean :)

      • Bette

        Well, I understand what you are saying about foods prepared more simply, and yes, it is satisfying to learn to enjoy solo/simple foods. However, I just don’t totally agree with the whole premise that limiting the ingredients is necessarily better-tasting or a more noble way to eat. Not all eating and tasting can be brought to intellectual terms or have anyone else’s values placed upon it. Nor do all people taste the basic flavors in the same way on their tongues and in their brains (and yes! there are a number of amazing scientific studies about these taste-bud differences that are starting to help us figure out why some people like or don’t like certain foods). I don’t think number of ingredients, flavors, spices… anything needs to limited for any reason at all other than to individual taste (and/or ingredient availability) that moment, which might mean enjoying an orange over the kitchen sink, or a many-ingredient favorite dish, whatever the moment dictates.

        • Michelle

          Agree! Time and a place for solo, and a time for the medley.

  • http://vogueyogini.com Amanda

    Great post. I love the idea of savoring a good quality food on its own, without having to mix everything together! Btw, I was at EATALY this weekend and have one thing to say: bliss! I could live there…

    • Michelle

      Ha! I know! How great would it be to hide behind the cheese counter and sample cheese all night when the staff went home…